Sunday, November 19, 2017

New "Commander Jace" title out soon; print omnibus likely in December

After considerable delay (largely due to the author doing an almost total rewrite last month for the purpose of inserting a new character and his subplot), we'll be releasing as soon as later this week an ebook of Kyler Fey's The Lust-Virus of Krampack, which is episode #4 of his erotic gay science-fantasy serial Commander Jace and the Unsuitable Boys. This new novella finally closes the chronological gap between episodes #1 and #5, which we published first in a "double" with his erotic memoir One Hundred Times. As outlandish as the previous episodes, episode #4 details what happens when a bizarre phenomenon of extreme lust overtakes the characters and everyone else around them while they are confronted at the same time with a sinister plot by their archenemies. An excerpt from its preface is copied below.

Because I love a pretty print book, I am considering compiling the first five episodes into a paperback omnibus. I think I can get it put together for a December release since I can follow the formatting of episode #5 for the four episodes that have not yet been prepared for paper and hopefully not get bogged down in a time-consuming formatting project. If this happens, there will be an ebook version of the omnibus as well. The print version will be a fairly thick book and look nice on the shelf (or on the bedside table, or under the bed) of any enthusiast of m/m erotica.

Items that bear a tangential relationship to the strange events of last summer…

1. When Colin Vorta—currently a member of Commander Jace Dekka’s “Unsuitable Boys” entity—was a student at the Dhalgren Academy in Kruze City, he and his friend Kyler More made for their senior thesis an experimental film (with themselves as the lead actors) titled Krampack, which was derived from an ancient play of the same title. The source material describes a sexual coming-of-age for two teenage male friends who, while left alone together for a few days at a beach house, set out to attempt to their lose their virginities with girls. This pair has a history of sexual experimentation with each other as well, engaging in a ritual of jerking each other off in bed in the dark, a custom that they refer to as “krampack.” One of the boys is coming to terms with the fact that he is gay and that he probably wants his friend to be his real lover, while the other boy is losing interest in this homoerotic play with his friend and wants to start a life of earnest and frequent hetero fucking.  The film that Colin and Kyler made is shot in black-and-white and is largely a musical with Colin himself singing its major set pieces. They chose costumes and props that evoke a Steam London science fiction milieu and they rendered all of the dialogue and song lyrics in Esperanto, an old artificial language that today has few living speakers. This, they said, was for the purpose of creating the atmosphere of a “foreign film from a country that never existed.” Also of note, the two young filmmakers—during their “krampack” scenes—engaged in unsimulated on-camera sex with each other. Colin, who is not a cis-male biologically but rather a Venusian maph —got pregnant by Kyler during the filming, but he terminated that pregnancy.

2. Two years later, another boy at the Dhalgren Academy—named Dagen Fallada—for his own senior thesis wrote a novel inspired by Colin and Kyler’s film. For his story Krampack Summer Heat!, Dagen merged elements of the general storyline of the film with details from his own life. While in the film Colin and Kyler played characters named Nico and Dani, in Dagen’s novel they were simply called Colin and Kyler, and this pair moves through a narrative that is in part the premise of their film and in part a story about the making of their film. Reality and fiction blur together further toward the end of the novel when it becomes apparent that Dagen imagines himself as Kyler More and the narrative become increasingly autobiographical in its details. During sex with the Colin character, Dagen/Kyler impregnates Colin and it is implied that they will carry on with the pregnancy and raise their child together. Krampack Summer Heat! was adapted many years later into a film titled Will You Say My Name?

3. But before that film, nearer the time of the events of the story that will eventually be told in these pages, the wildly popular singer Jaustin Moss released a song titled “Will You Say My Name?” which became a viral hit over much of the Earth and a sort of anthem of summer that year within the queer male-dominated Kruze Republic. That song was in itself an adaptation of one of Colin Vorta’s songs from his Krampack film. Jace Dekka, who had provided financial backing for the initial launch of Moss’s career, encouraged Moss to adapt the song into a synth-pop dance track with a reggaeton accent. The Jaustin Moss rendition replaces much of the original Esperanto lyrics with English but retains the Esperanto in a couple repeating phrases during the chorus. 


4. Another boy named Kyler, the writer Kyler Fey—who wrote this book— during his teens had a short relationship of intense sexual experimentation with another boy. Later, when he saw a twenty-first century film adaptation of the play Krampack (also the title of the film, though it was retitled Nico and Dani for its American release), he was reminded of that relationship because the boy with whom he’d traded many blowjobs and handjobs had eventually lost interest in continuing this practice, and he identified himself as straight thereafter. Though the relationship was short, Kyler documents in his journal over one hundred occurrences of cumming with this friend. But sometimes they’d do it several times in a single day, so the number rose quickly. Kyler recalls in his journal how the purple paint on the wall above the head of this boy’s bed was stained darkly with layers of spunk: the boy would habitually masturbate on his back and shoot his load up over himself, past his head and spatter the wall and never clean it up, and Kyler recalls how arousing he found these stains every time he saw them, the subtle cum-funk in the air from it. These journal entries also include the first references to the shivery fuck-thrill that Kyler always feels when his lovers say his name while they’re cumming inside him, in his hand, in his mouth, on his skin.

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Free download of SPUNK-ANGELS today

Below is the post from last week announcing Fey's new book. Today we offer free downloads of the epub-format book via Box. This is the link. NOTE: when you go to the link, it will say that format is "not supported" which might make one say WTF and leave unsatiisfied. This means only that Box does not support an on-screen preview or on-site reading of the thing because it doesn't support previews of epub files like it does for Word documents or PDFs. But if you click the download arrow, you will for sure get the book and be able to open it in your reading app.

M-Brane Press releases today as an ebook on Amazon Kyler Fey’s The Spunk-Angels of Mars, the third episode of his queer-erotic science fantasy serial Commander Jace and the Unsuitable Boys (though it’s the third installment, it’s the fourth published because we started with Episode #5 in February). In this third episode, some more of the general premise of series’s universe is exposed as well an important part of the backstory of one of the major regular characters. From the blurb on Amazon:

…Before he joined Commander Jace’s “Unsuitable Boys,” the spectacularly body-modified Trace Battle lived a bizarre life as a breeding-slave and an elite rentboy. During enslavement on the planet Mars to one of that world’s rulers, he found himself at the center of a series of remarkable events that shifted the course of Martian history and bound him forever to its future.

…Years later, ghosts from that past return in the form of strange and stunning winged men, and they have a message for Trace and all the members of his team.

…The Earth below and space above will quake when the Unsuitable Boys are visited by the Spunk-Angels of Mars! 

Overview of the series…
A thousand years from now and in another history, the Solar System teems with life. Ships sail the aether, linking humanity’s thousands of disparate nations and clades on all the planets and their many moons. Wars flare and fade, conspiracies thrive and then die, loves and lusts burn hotter than the sun. It is the age of the apex of the children of Earth, but in the deep background of the affairs of sprawling humanity, sinister forces, preternatural phenomena, ornate evil, and bizarre schemes reach everywhere. Standing against these, on the side of light, is the super-powerful Commander Jace and his elite (and lusty) cadre of astonishing queer young men…the so-called “Unsuitable Boys.”

A novella of 30,000 words, this story contains details of m/m passion in fantastical settings.

A reader of these stories so far can glean that a plot thread is developing, one involving a great threat to the main characters, that will eventually reach a climax someday, though the nature of its impact remains a mystery. Several clues, however, come forth from Trace’s backstory, and it becomes apparent that Commander Jace is preparing for some kind of major machinations even though he resides mostly in the background of this episode aside from a flashback depicting his first encounter with Trace and framing chapters  at the start and end of the story. Aside from the queer male-on-male sexual content that dominates most of this novella’s text, readers will also encounter some planetary romance elements on this universe’s version of “Old Mars,” as well as some more “mpreg” action. Spunk-Angels resembles in style the preceding volumes with its frequent shifts in point-of-view and timeframe, but this one is set mostly in the past as compared to the previously-published episodes, but still with a narrative frame that pulls its point into the storyline’s “present” era. 

It also differs slightly from the other episodes in the relative grittiness of its depictions of the interactions among the characters. The author says, “The angel story is set mostly a couple decades prior to the rest of the series before Jace’s work to finally destroy corporate human slavery had really taken hold. Trace, while younger than the Commander, is a lot older than the rest of the Boys, and he experienced his formative years during the last phase of the sperm-slaver era. For these reasons, the events and tone of Spunk-Angels have a brutality to them that was not as evident in the other episodes so far. All this will make more sense later in the series when the climax ties back to the Mars events.”

At the end of the book, there’s a little teaser blurb for Episode #4, The Lust-Virus of Krampack, which will finally close the rest of the gap between episodes #1 and #5. At this time, the series is projected to run for twenty episodes though we have discussed condensing some of the stories into fewer episodes.

Once Krampack is released (hopefully next month), we might make a print omnibus of the first five episodes with some special print-only features. That is assuming that a perhaps nine-hundred page print book makes sense.


Also of note for the completist is this other title that Kyler rolled out last month. The intent was a one-off sex memoir or “autofiction” as he calls it. It describes a still-ongoing hook-up that he has with a young man, but it also veers wildly into fantasy and includes an alternate-universe tie-in to Spunk-Angels. For ninety-nine cents, it’s a sweet look into Fey’s filthy head.

Monday, July 24, 2017

New Release: THE SPUNK-ANGELS OF MARS by Kyler Fey

M-Brane Press releases today as an ebook on Amazon Kyler Fey’s The Spunk-Angels of Mars, the third episode of his queer-erotic science fantasy serial Commander Jace and the Unsuitable Boys (though it’s the third installment, it’s the fourth published because we started with Episode #5 in February). In this third episode, some more of the general premise of series’s universe is exposed as well an important part of the backstory of one of the major regular characters. From the blurb on Amazon:

…Before he joined Commander Jace’s “Unsuitable Boys,” the spectacularly body-modified Trace Battle lived a bizarre life as a breeding-slave and an elite rentboy. During enslavement on the planet Mars to one of that world’s rulers, he found himself at the center of a series of remarkable events that shifted the course of Martian history and bound him forever to its future.

…Years later, ghosts from that past return in the form of strange and stunning winged men, and they have a message for Trace and all the members of his team.

…The Earth below and space above will quake when the Unsuitable Boys are visited by the Spunk-Angels of Mars! 

Overview of the series…
A thousand years from now and in another history, the Solar System teems with life. Ships sail the aether, linking humanity’s thousands of disparate nations and clades on all the planets and their many moons. Wars flare and fade, conspiracies thrive and then die, loves and lusts burn hotter than the sun. It is the age of the apex of the children of Earth, but in the deep background of the affairs of sprawling humanity, sinister forces, preternatural phenomena, ornate evil, and bizarre schemes reach everywhere. Standing against these, on the side of light, is the super-powerful Commander Jace and his elite (and lusty) cadre of astonishing queer young men…the so-called “Unsuitable Boys.”

A novella of 30,000 words, this story contains details of m/m passion in fantastical settings.

A reader of these stories so far can glean that a plot thread is developing, one involving a great threat to the main characters, that will eventually reach a climax someday, though the nature of its impact remains a mystery. Several clues, however, come forth from Trace’s backstory, and it becomes apparent that Commander Jace is preparing for some kind of major machinations even though he resides mostly in the background of this episode aside from a flashback depicting his first encounter with Trace and framing chapters  at the start and end of the story. Aside from the queer male-on-male sexual content that dominates most of this novella’s text, readers will also encounter some planetary romance elements on this universe’s version of “Old Mars,” as well as some more “mpreg” action. Spunk-Angels resembles in style the preceding volumes with its frequent shifts in point-of-view and timeframe, but this one is set mostly in the past as compared to the previously-published episodes, but still with a narrative frame that pulls its point into the storyline’s “present” era. 

It also differs slightly from the other episodes in the relative grittiness of its depictions of the interactions among the characters. The author says, “The angel story is set mostly a couple decades prior to the rest of the series before Jace’s work to finally destroy corporate human slavery had really taken hold. Trace, while younger than the Commander, is a lot older than the rest of the Boys, and he experienced his formative years during the last phase of the sperm-slaver era. For these reasons, the events and tone of Spunk-Angels have a brutality to them that was not as evident in the other episodes so far. All this will make more sense later in the series when the climax ties back to the Mars events.”

At the end of the book, there’s a little teaser blurb for Episode #4, The Lust-Virus of Krampack, which will finally close the rest of the gap between episodes #1 and #5. At this time, the series is projected to run for twenty episodes though we have discussed condensing some of the stories into fewer episodes.

Once Krampack is released (hopefully next month), we might make a print omnibus of the first five episodes with some special print-only features. That is assuming that a perhaps nine-hundred page print book makes sense.


Also of note for the completist is this other title that Kyler rolled out last month. The intent was a one-off sex memoir or “autofiction” as he calls it. It describes a still-ongoing hook-up that he has with a young man, but it also veers wildly into fantasy and includes an alternate-universe tie-in to Spunk-Angels. For ninety-nine cents, it’s a sweet look into Fey’s filthy head.

Monday, May 1, 2017

New Fey book available today on Amazon

The next installment of Kyler Fey's erotic science fantasy serial, The Twilight Boys at the Earth's Core!, is up on Amazon today, to be followed by availability on iBooks later in the week.

The synopsis from the Amazon listing...

In Episode #2, Zane’s astounding ability to move himself instantly through space brings him into a bizarre world never before seen by humans, a twilight land inhabited by weird and beautiful young men who seem to be as much plant as human. While asleep for what is only one night in his normal world, Zane seems to spend erotic weeks in this lusty domain. But has he accidentally discovered a new danger that will threaten his waking world?

You’re from the Up-and-Out! said the boy. From the Earth outside!
Zane wondered then where this boy was from. He sat on the ground and looked up at the boy and he wondered where he was. It was warm and humid like Maya Plaxa, but its sky had a greenish cast and a pale pink star hung straight overhead like a lamp hanging from the highest point of a hazy domed ceiling, not the sun of home, not the sun of anyone’s home. He felt a sick thrill of panic: could I have translated somewhere too far away, somewhere no one has been before? If the dim star overhead was not the sun, then he was not in the Solar System at all. That’s all it could mean! Every single human in their trillions through all history had never known the heat of another sun…

A thousand years from now and in another history, the Solar System teems with life. Ships sail the aether, linking humanity’s thousands of disparate nations and clades on all the planets and their many moons. Wars flare and fade, conspiracies thrive and then die, loves and lusts burn hotter than the sun. It is the age of the apex of the children of Earth, but in the deep background of the affairs of sprawling humanity, sinister forces, preternatural phenomena, ornate evil, and bizarre schemes reach everywhere. Standing against these, on the side of light, is the super-powerful Commander Jace and his elite (and libidinal) cadre of astonishing queer young men…the so-called “Unsuitable Boys.”


This episode contains the usual frank depictions of gay male sexual activity as well as human/alien sex and “mpreg.”

This installment is the second of the series chronologically (though the third published), and is a novella of about 30,000 words. The tale focuses on an adventure had by Zane with some asides into his backstory and that of his spouse Ethan. Commander Jace himself resides in the background of this one, though there is an extended flashback in several pieces from his POV detailing his first encounter with Ethan when Zane moved his young spouse into the Home for Unsuitable Boys and into the center of Jace's strange goings-on. As with the previous volumes--The Strange Case of the Tattooed Twink and The Intersex Boys of Venus--it is as full of fantastical premises and suppositions as it is with explicit sex, but it's perhaps even more bizarre than episode #1, and it extends the sense of unease over some kind of brewing threat to the main characters that they can't quite yet see.

I was intrigued to see this one finally done because I doubted that it would work. Fey's original sketchy outline for the entire series proposed an episode titled Faeries at the Center of the Earth, and little else about it other than that title and a couple brief sentences about a jungle village and dinosaurs and a lot of characters tromping about. It seemed like it might be a "Lost World"-type of adventure with the full cast ensemble. I think what we ended up with--a more intimate and rather trippy story focused on fewer characters--works better than what was in my head when I first heard of the idea.

Monday, April 24, 2017

"Mpreg" content in the Fey stories

We are very close to publication of Kyler Fey's The Twilight Boys at the Earth's Core!, and I noticed on Fey's Tumblr yesterday that his dream-state is evidently fairly infected with the fantasy elements of that story, particularly a variant on male pregnancy of which there a couple in his fictional universe.

I also posted on my journal today about the frequency of "mpreg" in his stories. 

Fey's mpreg/Bieber dream-story is below (warning: a bit explicit sexually; also probably kind of crude to some sensibilities).



Monday, April 17, 2017

Cover preview of new Kyler Fey title, ebook publication imminent

Publication is imminently forthcoming for Kyler Fey's Twilight Boys at the Earth's Core!, the second episode chronologically of his Commander Jace and the Unsuitable Boys serial (though it will be the third to be published since we released episode #5 The Intersex Boys of Venus first concurrently with his sex memoir One Hundred Times as standalone ebooks and also as a print double).

The story depicts an uncanny occurrence in which Zane, a young man with the peculiar ability to "translate" himself physically from one location to another while in an erotic dream state, repeatedly visits an alien land inhabited by beautiful but strange people who seem to be partially plant-based. Living under a dome-like sky with a pale pink sun suspended in it, these people welcome Zane into their society and he seems to spend long periods of time there while in his own world just a few minutes passes. It seems harmless enough but, as always for Commander Jace and his crew, a mysterious threat lurks just out of sight. Will Zane discover the real nature of the "Twilight Boys" and why he finds himself transported into their world?

As with the previously published installments, Twilight Boys at the Earth's Core! is an erotic science fantasy tale with a fair number of explicit depictions of male/male queer sex.

The author showed a different cover for his new book on his blog a couple weeks ago, but we have decided to go with this one. It's derived from an old photo titled "Boy with Palm Leaf" by Wilhelm von Gloeden, a turn-of-the-twentieth century photographer who worked mostly in Italy and is best know today for his male nudes, many prints of which were confiscated and destroyed as pornography during the Fascist period in Italy. I think I have managed to get away with having a fully naked dude on the cover by using the title text to obscure his genitals.

Monday, March 27, 2017

Free epub copies of INTERSEX BOYS OF VENUS

Ahead of the publication of the next couple installments of Kyler Fey's Commander Jace and the Unsuitable Boys saga--an erotic science fantasy serial of novella-length stories--we are making available complimentary copies of the epub version The Intersex Boys of Venus at this Box link. Box doesn't support previews of epub files, but it downloads just fine.

Kyler Fey's blog also has this information plus a brief excerpt from the story. Kyler's blog is somewhat "NSFW," by the way.

We are close to release of the next installment, which I think is titled Twilight Boys at the Earth's Core! (with the exclamation point, yes) but there has been some discussion over the wording of that title. But I think we're going with it. Kyler discusses the word-choice consideration in another post on his blog, and explains what he likes about his usage of "twilight" in this context.

This other image is a possible, though likely not final, version of the cover for Earth's Core!, and it's based on the design of the cover for The Strange Case of the Tattooed Twink. We may use this basic design, but with a licensed stock photo image of a model (this one is just some random dude from a Tumblr feed).

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Next (first, technically) "episode" of Kyler Fey's queer erotic science fantasy serial is live

Ebook cover for Episode #1
In the foreword to Kyler's Fey's semi-fictitious sex-confessional One Hundred Times, it's explained at some length that we concocted the plan for this gay science fantasy serial with the idea that it would be a quick run of fairly short ebooks, possibly all rolling out at once. But then somehow we ended up releasing the 35000-word novella The Intersex of Boys (intended as Episode #5 of the serial) in a lovely print edition, as part of a double back-to-back with One Hundred Times (the two volumes are out separately as ebooks as well). Because, if we're going to do it all, why not over-do it?

To make publishing out of the series' intended order work, some references to things in Intersex Boys from earlier unpublished episodes of the series that were not relevant to the story at hand were either removed or bumped into footnotes during the final edit so that the fifth installment can stand on its own without needing to know anything about episodes #1 through #4.

But now we have the very start of the thing, episode #1, The Strange Case of the Tattooed Twink. As of this posting, it's already live in the iBooks store, and it will probably pop up on Amazon by tomorrow. We'll update with links when it's live everywhere. UPDATED 3/13: It's live Amazon now, too.

From the product description and series overview...

The strange and lusty first episode of Kyler Fey’s queer science fantasy serial Commander Jace and the Unsuitable Boys!

In Episode #1—while some of the boys are away on a mission to Moon—Commander Jace and the rest of his team encounter an enigma on a beach, an ornately illustrated and beautiful young man who seems drawn to them, as if he were waiting to be found. But why was he there? Did someone send him? Is his mission a threat? They bring him back to the Home, but their unusual guest cannot speak, so Jace gives the telepathic Braden an order to peer into their visitor’s mind in that particular way that only Braden can. Will a day of intense passion in Braden’s bed unlock the secret of the tattooed twink, or will Jace and the Unsuitable Boys be left with an even bigger mystery?


A thousand years from now and in another history, the Solar System teems with life. Ships sail the aether, linking humanity’s thousands of disparate nations and clades on all the planets and their many moons. Wars flare and fade, conspiracies thrive and then die, loves and lusts burn hotter than the sun. It is the age of the apex of the children of Earth, but in the deep background of the affairs of sprawling humanity, sinister forces, preternatural phenomena, ornate evil, and bizarre schemes reach everywhere. Standing against these, on the side of light, is the super-powerful Commander Jace and his elite (and lusty) cadre of astonishing queer young men…the so-called “Unsuitable Boys.”



Saturday, February 25, 2017

New queer science fantasy titles released; more forthcoming

The first new titles in several years from M-Brane Press—The Intersex Boys of Venus and One Hundred Times, both by Kyler Fey—are now available as ebooks at Amazon, iBooks (find with in-app search), and Kobo, and also in a lovely print edition in “double” format, available February 28 at the major online bookstores. 

Cover flat of the print edition.


The first volume, The Intersex Boys of Venus, combines elements of pulp SF and planetary romance and with explicit gay erotica. Though it stands on its own, it is actually the fifth “episode” of a proposed twenty-one-part serial detailing the adventures of an enigmatic character named Commander Jace Dekka and his cadre of lubricious young men, the so-called “Unsuitable Boys.” The premise of its universe is described like this…

A thousand years from now and in another history, the Solar System teems with life. Ships sail the aether, linking humanity’s thousands of disparate nations and clades on all the planets and their many moons. Wars flare and fade, conspiracies thrive and then die, loves and lusts burn hotter than the sun. It is the age of the apex of the children of Earth, but in the deep background of the affairs of sprawling humanity, sinister forces, preternatural phenomena, ornate evil, and bizarre schemes reach everywhere. Standing against these, on the side of light, is the super-powerful Commander Jace and his elite (and lusty) cadre of astonishing queer young men…the so-called “Unsuitable Boys.”

Ideally, the rest of the episodes will appear in something like their intended sequential order, but Fey designed this serial so as to make it comprehensible wherever one starts with it, kind of like the Doc Savage serial novels or original-series Star Trek. You can pick it up wherever and get oriented. 

From the product description of the print edition as it appears on Amazon…

Side A: In Episode #5 of the “Commander Jace and the Unsuitable Boys” saga, THE INTERSEX BOYS OF VENUS, Jace sends telepathic Braden and brilliant Patrick to the lush and humid world Venus, hiding even from them the fact that their real mission is to pursue clues to a mystery, clues gleaned hazily from a bizarre clairvoyant fugue experienced by two of their teammates. Meanwhile, Jace investigates a lead among the randy students of an exclusive academy. Little does Jace know that the lithe and ardent Braden and the young rakehell Patrick will uncover a startling piece of information about the real machinations of their enemies while on Venus…while in bed with scores of that world’s extraordinary and amorous inhabitants. 

Side B: ONE HUNDRED TIMES…In this frank and rather humid erotic memoir, Unsuitable Boys author Kyler Fey tells of a summer fling with a young man who came to be a sort of muse, the living template for one of Fey’s lusty fictional characters. Fey shares in a series of graphically detailed anecdotes the events of that summer, and he opens a window into the creative process behind his erotic science-fantasy tales.

That second book, One Hundred Times, is not part of the Commander Jace series, but it offers some insight into it in the way that it details the author’s short sexual partnership with a guy who was the real-life template for one of the major characters in the series. It was written originally in a series of journal entries more or less concurrently with the drafting of Intersex Boys, and the two books occasionally echo each other. Like its companion book, One Hundred Times is quite sexually explicit throughout (there's even a brief sex scene in the author's foreword). Because it is not set in the other volume’s fictional universe (though there are some intrusions by that universe into its “reality”), it might find its own audience among readers who are into writers' memoirs (with lots of queer sex in them) but maybe not so much into the Intersex Boys’ genre.

These books are not, by the way, short stories like a lot of the erotica titles that one finds for the Kindle. Intersex Boys runs to about 140 pages in print form, and One Hundred Times to nearly 200 pages. The fact that Intersex Boys ended up being as hefty as it is, makes me wonder a little bit about the rate at which I am going to see finished manuscripts of the other twenty episodes. When the concept of this serial first came up, the plan was to roll out very quickly—possibly all at once—all of the installments and then possibly make an omnibus of them in print form. But that was when I thought that each installment was going to be a typical five-thousand-word short story like most of those erotic “books” in the Kindle store. When Intersex Boys came in at thirty-five-thousand words, I was kind of dumbstruck. If they are all going to be that long—the author says they won’t all be—then this is whole different publication project than I’d originally imagined. 


Even though Intersex Boys ends with a short preview of Episode #6 The Royal Rentboy of Kasei, I think the next title out will be Episode #1 The Case of the Tattooed Twink. I’ll put updates here as they happen.